Tag: Child Safety

9 essential water safety tips for kids

There’s nothing like basking in the sun during the summer and taking a dip in the cool ocean, lake or pool whenever you feel too hot. Fantastic for kids and adults alike, cool bodies of water are something many people revel in. To ensure that you have an awesome time in the water this summer, remember to protect your children from potential risks by checking out these 9 essential kids’ water safety tips.

1. Use the buddy system

Even if you’re at a pool or a beach with lifeguards, make sure you’ve got someone with you at all times. If something was to go wrong and you were with someone, they could either help you themselves or call for help from someone else.

 

2. Never leave a child unattended

An obvious rule of thumb – always watch what your kids are doing. If you’ve got young children, make sure you know where they are at all times.

 

3. Sign your kids up for swimming lessons!

The best way to prevent disaster from occurring is to make sure everyone knows how to swim – this includes your kids and you, if you have never learnt.. If your kids don’t have too much experience in the water, it’s always good to know that they have had enough practice to keep themselves afloat.

 

4. Use life jackets

If you’re on a boat, a life jacket is a necessity. The last thing you want is to be stranded out to sea or on a lake with no life jacket. Even if you know how to swim, there comes a point when complete exhaustion and hypothermia can set in. If you have kids that don’t know how to swim, make sure they’ve got on a US Coast Guard-approved life jacket.

 

5. Stay near lifeguards

Whether you’re at the ocean or in a pool, stay within sight of the lifeguard. These people are trained professionals, so make sure they’re around when you’re in the water.

 

6. No running!

According to Strickland, Agner & Associates, slip and fall accidents are extremely common and often happen when the floor is wet or the concrete is slippery. When you’re at the pool, don’t just tell your kids not to run – remember that you shouldn’t run either.

 

7. Be conscious of natural bodies of water

Mother Nature is unpredictable, so when you’re at the ocean where the tides are always changing, make sure you stay incredibly attentive. Don’t let yourself or a loved one drift out to sea before you or they even realize what’s happened. Pay special attention for riptides and teach people how to swim away from them safely.

 

8. Teach Kids to stay away from drains

If a bathing suit or hair got stuck in a drain or suction outlet, it can be extremely dangerous. Be careful of drains that are missing covers as well.

 

9. Learn CPR

Bystanders are often among the first to be able to help a drowning victim. No matter who you’re with or where you are, CPR is an incredibly useful certification to have.

About the author

Amy Patterson is a regular contributor to Very Best For Kids, writing mainly on child safety topics. From North Carolina, you will usually find her catching up on the latest news with locals or on the beach with her family. Besides safety, Amy also writes about health, fitness, wellness, and family. 

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4 spring activities for families

With winter slipping into hibernation and spring beginning to blossom, there’s no time like the present to embrace all that this season has to offer! Warmth from the sun mixed with a cool breeze, birds chirping and rainbows of flowers coming into bloom make this the perfect time of year for you and the kids to embrace the joys of nature. The days are getting longer, giving you plenty of time to get outdoors with your family and enjoy some much-needed fresh air.

One of the best things about this season is that there is an abundance of activities that you and your family can partake in outdoors at little cost! Here are some wallet-friendly activities that will get you outside and enjoying quality time with your kids.

Take you kids strawberry picking

Pick-your-own orchards are a fantastic way to spend time with the family while celebrating all that Mother Nature has to offer this spring.

This is also a great way to give your kids some freedom to run, jump, play, and get excited about gardening and growing your own foods. Not only will they learn, but they’ll also expel that excess energy that winter was keeping at bay!

This fun-filled day doesn’t end when you leave the orchard, though. When you get home, you and your family can make jam, jelly or endless other strawberry goodies!

A Weekend Trip to Washington, DC

take kids to Washington dc

The beautiful weather that spring brings makes it the perfect time to take a family road trip. This time of year, Washington, DC is full of life and color as its cherry blossoms bloom. You might even be able to make the Cherry Blossom Festival for parades and kite flying on the National Mall.

And the best part about DC? Most museums are free or donation based, so you and your whole family could spend the day exploring and learning for as little cost as you’d like!

Take the kids for a picnic at the park

A family picnic at your local park can provide an entire day of fun. Lay a blanket out in the grass, relax and enjoy! Pack a fresh lunch, feed the ducks, blow bubbles, and fly kites. This is a great opportunity for you and your family to explore close to home.

Throw a backyard sprinkler party & water balloon extravaganza

water fight kids

For and awesome stay at home Saturday, you only need one special ingredient to make your kids extra happy: water. Set up a few sprinklers in the backyard, grab a bag or two of water balloons, and fill ‘em up! Play parents versus kids, girls versus boys and see what happens! You can even invite some of the neighborhood kids and their parents over to add some extra excitement. There’s nothing like splashing around in water with soft grass beneath your feet to keep you cool on a warm spring day.

Safety to consider

Outdoor activities can be lots of fun, but safety is always the first priority. According to Marks & Harrison, a pedestrian is injured in the US every seven minutes. When you’re exploring cities or towns on foot, make sure the whole family sticks together and that you watch closely before crossing any intersections. Enjoy your time together as a family and take in all of the sights and sounds, but also stay attentive to your surroundings and you’ll be guaranteed to have an amazing spring day!

About the author

Amy Patterson is a regular contributor to Very Best For Kids, writing mainly on child safety topics. From North Carolina, you will usually find her catching up on the latest news with locals or on the beach with her family. Besides safety, Amy also writes about health, fitness, wellness, and family. 

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Teach Your Child to Be a Safe Pedestrian Children as young as preschool age should learn how to cross the street safely, as well as practice becoming aware, traffic-smart pedestrians. The Association for Psychological Science (APS) reports that getting struck by a car is the third leading cause of death for children between the ages of 5 and 9. Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that nearly 1 in 4 traffic deaths among children, ages 14 and under, are pedestrian deaths. According to Peoria pedestrian accident attorney, Zachary Mushkatel, there are many factors that lead to these tragic numbers, such as drivers not seeing children and children not understanding the rate of speed a car is traveling, but even children of a young age can be taught to be safe pedestrians when crossing the street. Start Teaching Pedestrian Safety Early Although the majority of children start walking independently at a very young age it doesn’t mean that they understand the concept of pedestrian safety. However, parents and caregivers can help even the youngest of children to begin to understand how to be a pedestrian by being role models and using crosswalks themselves. For example, when carrying or pushing your toddler in a stroller across an intersection, you may consider saying, “Don’t forget to look both ways!” “Look for the WALK sign!” “Make sure there are no cars coming!” With repetitive instruction, exaggerated head movements of looking side to side, and being consistent every time you cross a street, your child may pick up on key elements of pedestrian safety before he or she is able to walk with you in the crosswalk. How to Be the Safest Pedestrian In a perfect and safe world there would be sidewalks in every neighborhood, clearly marked and easy to access crosswalks, a crossing guard at every corner, and drivers who were always on the lookout for pedestrians. Unfortunately, pedestrians of all ages struggle to get across busy intersections before the light changes and some neighborhoods don’t have sidewalks, leaving pedestrians to walk precariously in the street. When teaching your child how to be a safe pedestrian, it’s a good idea to talk about all scenarios (such as what to do if there’s no sidewalk): • Always Use a Crosswalk: Even if it would be shorter and easier to cross the street in the middle of the block, always use a crosswalk whenever possible. Teach your child that a crosswalk is designed to “alert” drivers to drive slower and pay attention to people crossing the street. Make sure your child knows that he or she should not attempt to cross in the crosswalk until they have looked both ways and cars have stopped. • Never Try to Outrun a Car: Your child may think that he or she is a fast runner, but it’s vital that he or she knows to never attempt to outrun a car that is approaching a crosswalk. Explain that even cars that look like they are moving slow, move much faster than humans. • Be Seen: Remind your child that even though crosswalks are designed to alert drivers that pedestrians may be crossing, never assume that a driver will see you. The best time to cross is with the help of a crossing guard, another adult, or when there are no cars nearby. While some children exhibit the ability to cross the street safely on their own at an early age, don’t allow your child to cross the street until he or she can verbally explain to you the process of crossing the street and what to do if a bicyclist or motorist is heading towards a crosswalk.

Children as young as preschool age should learn how to cross the street safely, as well as practice becoming aware, traffic-smart pedestrians. The Association for Psychological Science (APS) reports that getting struck by a car is the third leading cause of death for children between the ages of 5 and 9. Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that nearly 1 in 4 traffic deaths among children aged 14 and under are pedestrian deaths.

According to Peoria pedestrian accident attorney, Zachary Mushkatel, there are many factors that lead to these tragic numbers, such as drivers not seeing children and children not understanding the rate of speed a car is traveling, but even children of a young age can be taught to be safe pedestrians when crossing the street.

Start teaching pedestrian safety early

Although the majority of children start walking independently at a very young age, it doesn’t mean that they understand the concept of pedestrian safety. However, parents and caregivers can help even the youngest of children to begin to understand how to be a pedestrian by being role models and using crosswalks themselves. For example, when carrying or pushing your toddler in a stroller across an intersection, you may consider saying, “Don’t forget to look both ways!” “Look for the WALK sign!” “Make sure there are no cars coming!” With repetitive instruction, exaggerated head movements of looking side to side, and being consistent every time you cross a street, your child may pick up on key elements of pedestrian safety before he or she is able to walk with you in the crosswalk.

How to be the safest pedestrian

In a perfect and safe world there would be sidewalks in every neighborhood, clearly marked and easy to access crosswalks, a crossing guard at every corner, and drivers who were always on the lookout for pedestrians. Unfortunately, pedestrians of all ages struggle to get across busy intersections before the light changes and some neighborhoods don’t have sidewalks, leaving pedestrians to walk precariously in the street. When teaching your child how to be a safe pedestrian, it’s a good idea to talk about all scenarios (such as what to do if there’s no sidewalk):

Always use a crosswalk: Even if it would be shorter and easier to cross the street in the middle of the block, always use a crosswalk whenever possible. Teach your child that a crosswalk is designed to “alert” drivers to drive slower and pay attention to people crossing the street. Make sure your child knows that he or she should not attempt to cross in the crosswalk until they have looked both ways and cars have stopped.

Never try to outrun a car: Your child may think that he or she is a fast runner, but it’s vital that he or she knows to never attempt to outrun a car that is approaching a crosswalk. Explain that even cars that look like they are moving slow, move much faster than humans.

Be seen: Remind your child that even though crosswalks are designed to alert drivers that pedestrians may be crossing, never assume that a driver will see you. The best time to cross is with the help of a crossing guard, another adult, or when there are no cars nearby.

While some children exhibit the ability to cross the street safely on their own at an early age, don’t allow your child to cross the street until he or she can verbally explain to you the process of crossing the street and what to do if a cyclist or motorist is heading towards a crosswalk.

About the author

Amy Patterson is a regular contributor to Very Best For Kids, writing mainly on child safety topics. From North Carolina, you will usually find her catching up on the latest news with locals or on the beach with her family. Besides safety, Amy also writes about health, fitness, wellness, and family. 

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Ensure Your Homestead is Secure

Safety and security need to be the top concerns for every homeowner. You do not want your house to be a vulnerable target for criminals. You need to start taking action today. Here are a few ways to ensure your family and home are safe no matter what.

Keep your property brightly lit

You want to start by keeping your property brightly lit especially at night. This means installing outdoor lights on the walls of your house. Target the areas around doors, windows and driveways. You might also want to put landscape lights around the property near potential hiding places like bushes. Criminals usually avoid brightly lit properties.

Upgrade window and door locks

Upgrade all the window and door locks around your home. Get multiple deadbolt locks for each door leading outside. Install good locks on windows that attach to the frame. Secure your garage door and any interior door leading away from the garage. This is your first line of defense against criminals trying to break into your house.

Get good homeowners’ insurance

It is critical that you are prepared for anything when it comes to home safety. This is why you need to have good home insurance with comprehensive coverage of everything. Professionals, like those at Colling Insurance Services Inc, know that finding a customized insurance policy that fits your individual situation is necessary.  A good insurance policy will pay for stolen possessions and the cost to repair unexpected damage to your house. Many policies can also provide liability coverage if someone is injured on your property. A home insurance policy will protect you, your family, and your valuable possessions.

Consider erecting a fence

A direct way to keep your home safe is by erecting a fence around the property. A tall fence will be a deterrent to criminals. It makes it very difficult to climb onto the property unseen and then leave with any possessions. The fence also helps to keep children or pets on your property instead of wandering out into the street.

Install a modern camera system

A final step is to install a modern, monitored video system. This type of system will protect your house and family at all times. Monitoring means that you can keep an eye on your property and make a fast call to the proper authorities. Many systems even have thermal imaging and infrared to be able to see in the dark or during inclement weather. A closed-circuit camera system is an excellent way to secure your home.

You should not take anything for granted when it comes to home safety and security. Be certain to address any vulnerabilities that you detect as soon as you can. You also need to plan for what to do if your house is burglarized or vandalized. Taking these steps will help to keep your home and family safe.

About the author

Rachelle Wilber is a freelance writer living in the San Diego, California area. She graduated from San Diego State University with her Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism and Media Studies. Follow her on  Facebook and Twitter: @RachelleWilber.

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6 Tips to Help Keep your Family Safe

The most important thing in our life is our families. We want to protect them and nurture them to ensure they stay safe from harm. This is easier said than done in the world we live in today. How best can you keep your family safe? Let’s take a closer look and see with 6 tips to keep your family safe.

Invest in an Alarm System

Our homes are our safe havens, but they are not impregnable fortresses. They can often easily be broken in to through windows or doors that have forgotten to be locked. Peace of mind comes from knowing that you’re safe in your home, which is why having a good home alarm system can help ease stress and keep your family safe while they’re sleeping.

Buy a Dog

Another way to keep your family safe is by getting a dog. Dogs have been mankind’s best from for thousands of years. That’s with good reason, too. They’re loyal and the right breed will do anything they can to ward off any intruders or people who are up to no good. They’re also a great backup alarm system, as they can detect things better than machines.

Utilize Technology

We’re living in the internet age. There are so many ways that people can take advantage of the new technology coming out. There are a variety of smartphone apps out there that can help you keep track of small children while you’re away from them. Also, simply having a way to call home or send a text message is a great way to ease your mind.

Utilize Family Legal Counsel

If you do have a problem within your family, never be afraid to reach out and seek family legal counsel. The professionals, like those at Madison Law Firm PLLC, are used to dealing with all sorts of family related things and will be able to give you and your family the representation needed.

Have a Game Plan

If something does happen such as a fire or a break-in or anything else, it’s best to be prepared for the worst. Make sure to talk with your family about situations involving fires, such as how to leave the house safely and where to meet up. Also, make sure that everyone has a variety of contact numbers so they can’t get a hold of you immediately.

Find Neighbors to Trust

You can’t be home all the time. Get involved in your neighborhood and make friends with the people across the street to help watch over your place and give you that piece of mind you need to rest easy. There is strength in numbers.

Overall, there are a number of ways to keep your family safe and secure. The key thing is to prepare so you know what you need to do before you need to do it.

About the Author

Kara Masterson is a freelance writer from West Jordan, Utah. She graduated from the University of Utah and enjoys writing and spending time with her dog, Max.

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snowzilla-1192790_1280

While you should always strive to be a safe and aware driver, getting behind the wheel during the winter months can require a few extra precautions in order to stay safe on the road. This season can be especially intimidating for new teen drivers. If you are working to teach your son or daughter how to drive safely in the snow, make sure you go over these steps.

Vehicle safety

Proper vehicle maintenance is always necessary but is especially crucial in winter driving conditions. Making sure your brakes are in good working order is important, but the condition of your tires can play an equally important role in the overall control and safety of the car. Pay attention to tread depth and wear, and always replace your tires when necessary. Bald tires do not stop well, regardless of the condition of your brakes.
Windshield wipers are a simple maintenance item that often get overlooked. Do a quick check of the condition of your wipers every time you stop for gas, looking for rips and tears in the blades. While you’re at it, be sure to fill your windshield wiper fluid. If you live in a cold climate, make sure you are using a fluid that is formulated not to freeze as temperatures drop.

In addition to proper vehicle maintenance, it is a good idea to keep an emergency and first aid kit in your vehicle. A window brush and ice scraper are useful additions to your kit during the winter, and it is a good idea to keep an extra jacket or blanket handy as well.

Minimize distractions

During adverse driving conditions, it is especially vital to minimize the distractions inside your own vehicle. It could be the radio, your cell phone, a pet, or a chatty friend, but it only takes a moment to be distracted and take your eyes off the road. Minimizing distractions will help you stay alert to potentially dangerous events occurring around you, and help you avoid these situations.

Help your teen set up rules for themselves while driving. Whether it’s promising to keep the phone in the glovebox or only driving with friends with your permission, have them find ways to take responsibility for their own safety. If you give them a chance to help come up with these rules, you’ll have an easier time getting them to drive safely.

Slow down and leave space

This is one of the most important tips for safe winter driving. Whether you are navigating through rain or snow, it pays to take your time. Vehicles do not handle as well, and take longer to stop when the roads are wet, snowy, or icy, so slow down and leave more space between you and the vehicle in front of you. Planning ahead and taking your time breaking minimizes the need to slam on your brakes, which can cause your brakes to lock and you to lose control of your vehicle. It also allows those driving behind you to plan ahead and stop in plenty of time.

According to Scherline and Associates, 42,000 people die in car accidents every year. Driving in bad conditions doesn’t make these numbers look any better either. Winter driving doesn’t have to be stressful, though, by planning ahead and slowing down, you can navigate the roads with your teen and arrive safely even in less than ideal conditions.

About the author

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most her time hiking, biking and gardening. 

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children and ATVs

You may have fond memories of visiting friends or family members who owned ATVs such as four-wheelers. Your parents may even have had lax rules about ATV safety or maybe they didn’t even know that you snuck a ride on your older cousin’s four-wheeler, but even if you walked away without a scratch it doesn’t mean that ATVs were any safer in the past than they are today.

As a parent of young children, you may be faced with the same dilemma your parents faced decades ago. Do you let your kids have a little fun and hop on a four-wheeler? Unless you have an appropriately sized ATV vehicle for your child and your child is physically prepared, the smart and safe answer should be “no”.

Should Children Have Access to ATVs?

ATV use is popular across the country due to outdoor loving, thrill seeking riders. While ATVs can provide hours of outdoor fun and adventure, they are also utilitarian vehicles used to provide transportation in rural areas. One thing that many fail to acknowledge is that ATVs are not created for kids and, as a result, children well below the age of 16 are injured and even killed because they don’t have the proper strength or skill to safely operate an adult-sized ATV.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, throughout the past decade, nearly 1,200 children have been killed across the USA and a further 350,000 have been hospitalized after riding an adult-sized ATV. Additionally, approximately 90% of the children who were killed while riding ATVs, were riding ATVs specifically designed for adults.

Why are ATVs particularly dangerous for younger children? At full speed, they can exceed 60 miles per hour and are as difficult to control as a road vehicle. Like other vehicles, according to Damon Ellis, a West Virginia car accident lawyer, speeding can lead to the operator losing control of his or her vehicle.

Are There Any Exceptions to Children Operating ATVs?

There is no single rule about ATV use across the U.S. and this is troubling since an ATV requires the same kind of coordination, strength, and skill as other vehicles, yet cars can’t be legally driven by individuals until they are around 16. If you wouldn’t trust your child behind the wheel of a car, then he or she has no place riding an adult-sized ATV alone. To further stress this point, The American Academy of Pediatrics warns parents that no child under the age of 16 should operate or ride an ATV because they are simply incapable of operating the heavy and complex machines.

If you are intent on allowing your child to participate in a life of ATVs, you must make careful and smart decisions about your purchase. For instance, is your child coordinated or strong enough to safely operate an ATV that is designed for his or her age? Secondly, does he or she have mental maturity to make safe and smart decisions?

Additionally, power and speed should be a crucial part of your decision making. Don’t buy something too big or fast with the hope that your child might “grow into it”. As a parent, always supervise your child while he or she operates their ATV, consider enrolling your child in an ATV safety course and always make sure your child is wearing proper safety gear.

By Amy Patterson

Author Bio: Amy Patterson is an avid reader on trending topics and a writer in her spare time. On the beautiful coast of North Carolina, you will usually find her catching up on the latest news with locals or on the beach with her family. She loves to write pieces on health, fitness, and wellness but often writes about families and safety.

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Tire surfaced playgrounds

In recent years, recycled tires are being put to use for creating tire surface playgrounds. The United States EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) gave the stats that nearly 290 million scrap tires need to be disposed of every year with a good 28 million being recycled for different types of surfaces.

Recycling is a logical option as tire rubber seems less likely to injure kids when and if they fall. Recycling also reduces the landfills where space is limited and prevents the hazard of these disposed tires catching fire and releasing dangerous chemicals into the groundwater and air.

The recycled tires are used as:

  1. Rubber mulch or “crumb” (loose tire shred) on surfaces and it can be raked.
  2. A combination of binder and tire shreds that are poured onto a permanent surface
  3. Factory molded tiles from the binder/tire shred combo that are glued onto the playground surfaces.

Scientific studies raise safety concerns

Three laboratory studies were carried out in 2007 by the California OEHHA (Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment) investigating possible risks to the health of children from these recycled tire surfaces. One study evaluated the level of chemicals like mercury, arsenic, and several hazardous hydrocarbons that could be harmful if children ate parts of the tires or put their hands in their mouth after touching the playground surface. The other two studies examined injuries from falls on recycled tire playground surfaces as opposed to wood chips, and if air or water could be contaminated by recycled tire shreds.

From these studies, it is seen that repeated or long-term exposure might be harmful to a child’s health.

The Environment and Human Health, Inc. (EHHI) conducted a study at Yale University in 2015. The report analyzed the chemicals found in five samples of tire crumbs from five different companies that install school athletic fields and nine different samples taken from nine different unopened bags of playground tire mulch.

96 chemicals were found in the samples. Of the chemicals examined in the studies, many were irritants (substances that cause a reaction from the body). 24% were respiratory irritants (can cause asthma symptoms); 37% were skin irritants, and 27% happened to be eye irritants. It was also found that 20% of the chemicals tested could probably be the cause of delayed cancer diagnosis.

What protection can you give your kids?

We must bear in mind that kids are more susceptible to being harmed by chemical exposure from the environment than adults as they are still developing. It is imperative that you greatly reduce or totally eliminate any contact that may occur with known and suspected harmful substances. Choose another playground in your area that doesn’t have a recycled rubber play surface.

More than ever before, you must emphasize and teach your children the importance of washing their hands after playing or touching anything that should not have been touched. All the agencies urge us, as parents, to make washing hands part of the norm.

In addition, if you find any type of tire debris or see any loose tire shreds on your child after playing at the playground, remove them from shoes and clothes before they enter the house.

Author Bio: Amy Patterson is an avid reader on trending topics and a writer in her spare time. On the beautiful coast of North Carolina, you will usually find her catching up on the latest news with locals or on the beach with her family. She loves to write pieces on health, fitness, and wellness but often writes about families and safety. 

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check your cilds wishlist

If your child is old enough to make a holiday wishlist it’s most likely made up of multiple pages filled with various toys. While your child probably won’t be receiving everything on his or her wish list, it’s important to make sure the toys that he or she does receive are safe. Toys are integral to a child’s imagination, creativity, and education, but if they pose a threat to a child’s well-being they are far from beneficial.

Each year, children are sent to the ER with serious injuries related to a faulty or dangerous toy. According to Zachary Mushkatel, a Glendale personal injury lawyer, an injury resulting from a child’s toy is often an accidental injury, but they can also be prevented. More often than not, a toy-related injury is the direct result of someone’s carelessness, particularly in the manufacturing of the toy. Fortunately, for parents who do a little research and take extra care in choosing their child’s toys, a life-changing injury can be prevented.

Before You Buy

When purchasing toys for your child you may have a few rules. Maybe it needs to be a “quiet” toy without batteries or should be mostly educational or non-violent in nature. Since your child is tough on toys, maybe you don’t want to spend more than $15 on any toy until he or she gets a little older. Before you take your child’s wish list to the store and fulfill the list, do a little research.

Check Recall Lists: The United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), has a mission to keep all consumers, young and old, safe from any products that pose a threat. Before you purchase a specific toy for your child, check to make sure it hasn’t been recalled; as recalled toys should not be available for purchase. (EU readers can search here.) If you have purchased an item that has been recalled, be sure to follow the proper precautionary steps in returning the item. Do not let your child continue to play with the toy.

Edit Your Child’s List: As a parent, it’s up to you to decide what is an appropriate gift. Help any potential gift givers (such as relatives or friends) by giving a specific list of toys that you have already pre-approved. If someone gives your child a gift that you don’t think is safe, exchange it for something else. Don’t make a big deal out of the “wrong” gift; sometimes it’s the thought that counts.

Keeping Toys Safe in the Home

Children have and will always be hard on their toys, however, it doesn’t mean that the toy should or will automatically become dangerous. The best way to extend the life and safety of the toy is by teaching your child how to play with the toy. Make sure you monitor your child as he or she plays with toys and pay attention to any pieces that break off or go missing. Always make sure that a toy is age appropriate and doesn’t have too many small pieces for young children (as they can be a choking hazard). If the toy is too advanced but safe, for your child, store it away safely until he or she is of the right age.

Author Bio: Amy Patterson is an avid reader on trending topics and a writer in her spare time. On the beautiful coast of North Carolina, you will usually find her catching up on the latest news with locals or on the beach with her family. She loves to write pieces on health, fitness, and wellness but often writes about families and safety. 

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